April 20, 2012

Maryland residents and activists speak out against the NDAA

Residents and activists of Takoma Park, MD, petitioned the city council to adopt a resolution which would affirm constitutional freedoms and reject the indefinite military detention provisions of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA). “Human rights know no national or
April 4, 2012

Political opposites unite against the NDAA

The Occupy movement and the Tea Party are seemingly polar opposites on the American political spectrum, and with partisan politics bringing federal and state legislatures to a standstill, one could be forgiven for presuming that Occupiers and Tea Partiers would
March 29, 2012

Ex-FBI informant reveals truth about spying on Muslim communities

Last week The Guardian reported the shocking story of ex-FBI informant Craig Monteilh and his participation in undercover assignments to draw out radical Muslims as part of the FBI’s attempt to prevent terrorist attacks before they occur. The FBI “confidential
March 26, 2012

Amazingly, due process is now a debatable point

Who would have believed it? Constitutional “due process” is now under debate across the United States. The latest lively debate regarding the president’s right to assassinate American citizens without due process was on Friday’s Real Time with Bill Maher. Glenn
March 25, 2012

What other skeletons lurk in the NYPD’s closet?

The New York City Police Department (NYPD) has been embroiled in national controversy after revelations that the department secretly infiltrated cities and states around the Northeast to spy on students, businesses and houses of worship—based not on any reason to
March 18, 2012

Authorities quietly finding ways to revoke the right to assemble

According to Steven Rosenfeld of Alternet, authorities have five tactics that will be used against protesters in the coming year. These tactics are found in “the main pages from the anti-protest playbook being fine-tuned by municipal officials in advance of
March 5, 2012
protesters in orange jumpsuits parade in front of whitehouse blanketed in snow.

The Awesome Authorities of the Secret Service

HR347, officially titled the Federal Restricted Buildings and Grounds Improvement Act, tweaks a part of the criminal code that gives the Secret Service authority to restrict access and secure buildings and areas where the President, Vice-president and other officials under their protection are.
February 12, 2012

Guantánamo, Ten Years Later

January 12, 2012, was the tenth anniversary of the Guantánamo Bay prison. In “honor” of this event, Truthdig interviewed Andy Worthington, author of The Guantánamo Files and co-director of “Outside the Law: Stories from Guantanamo.” He updated the various aspects
February 4, 2012

Torture then, now, and in the future?

The January/February issue of Atlantic includes a fascinating (and depressing) article by Cullen Murphy examining the notorious Spanish Inquisition, and a series of disturbing parallels with torture authorized under US policy until recently. Murphy notes how extensive documentation of torture
January 29, 2012

Peaceful dissent threatened by Chicago ordinance

This spring, the North Atlantic Trade Organization (NATO) and the Group of Eight (G8) summits will be held in Chicago.  For months, groups have planned visibile displays of mass dissent to challenge the impacts of their policies. After having helped
January 24, 2012

Supreme Court rejects GPS tracking, but on narrow grounds

Today, a unanimous Supreme Court decided in US v. Jones that police must seek judicial authorization before placing a GPS tracking device on a suspect’s car.  On the one hand, the decision represents a resounding victory for Fourth Amendment and
January 24, 2012

Supreme Court rejects GPS tracking, but on narrow grounds

Today, a unanimous Supreme Court decided in US v. Jones that police must seek judicial authorization before placing a GPS tracking device on a suspect’s car.  On the one hand, the decision represents a resounding victory for Fourth Amendment and
January 18, 2012

European Judges Open Investigations Into Guantánamo Torture

Two European judges have opened investigations into the torture of detainees held at Guantánamo Bay detention center. Three French citizens assert in a lawsuit that they were “subject to violence including torture and rape” while being held at Guantánamo. Sophie
January 16, 2012

Is the US still the land of the free?

On Friday, George Washington University Law Professor Jonathan Turley published an excellent op-ed in The Washington Post.  In “10 Reasons the US is no longer the land of the free,” Professor Turley notes that: Even as we pass judgment on