Patrick G. Eddington

April 29, 2021

Jordan Cove Pipeline Protests: Is the FBI Still Spying on Activists?

By Patrick G. Eddington April 29, 2021 It’s been over three months since the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission threw a regulatory wrench into Canada-based Pembina Pipeline Corporation’s proposed Jordan Cove liquified natural gas (LNG) terminal project, and the legal battle
March 18, 2021

Does the FBI Spy on FOIA Requesters?

By Patrick G. Eddington The 55-year-old Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) was authored by the late John Moss (D-CA) as an essential tool for citizens to wield to uncover what Executive branch officials were doing in their name. National Sunshine
February 18, 2021

Oscar De Priest: Black Congressional Pioneer

In becoming the first Black American elected to Congress since Reconstruction—and the son of former slaves, no less—Illinois Representative Oscar De Priest faced challenges and threats on multiple fronts. First, it was his erstwhile House colleagues, specifically long-time racists like John Rankin (D-MS) and Thomas Jefferson Busby (D-MS). 
January 4, 2021

The Assange Extradition Decision: No Time To Celebrate

On January 4, Westminster Magistrates’ District Court Judge Vanessa Baraitser finally handed down her long-awaited decision regarding the American government’s extradition request on radical transparency activist Julian Assange. In short, she denied the U.S. government’s extradition request—not because she bought
November 11, 2020

America’s Veterans: Citizens, Soldiers, Spies and Targets

Despite the esteem politicians claim to hold for veterans, behind the scenes, the FBI and even the Army is willing to spy on vets.
October 2, 2020

Prepublication Review: Court-sanctioned Censorship 

For First Amendment and government transparency advocates, the fall of 2020 is off to a decidedly dreary start. On September 29, Judge Liam O’Grady in the federal Eastern District of Virginia gave the Department of Justice and the Intelligence Community
September 17, 2020

Constitution Day 2020: Chaos and Continuity

Almost 170 years ago, Fredrick Douglass created a stir in the Abolitionist movement via an essay in the May 23, 1851 edition of William Lloyd Garrison’s The Liberator, declaring that the Constitution “might be made consistent in its details with
June 10, 2020

Race, Violence, and Political Illegitimacy

Perhaps it’s appropriate that with July 4th, the anniversary of America’s violent break from Britain, less than a month away, the issue of state-sponsored violence and reactions by citizens to it is, once again, front and center in our national
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